Oxoniensia volume 80 published27th March, 2016

Oxoniensia, vol. 80 is now available to subscribers. Apologies for the delay getting the online version loaded this year. OAHS members can read the online version by clicking on the ‘Browse volumes’ tab to the right of this screen and scrolling down to the bottom of the next page (or follow this shortcut). Volumes 75 (2010) moves to open access.

Fiches21st December, 2014

When assembling the volumes for scanning, we extracted the fiches from their pockets and arranged to have them scanned separately. Unfortunately whatever technology was used to attach the pockets to the journal has not stood up to the passage of 40 odd years and some of the pockets have as a result fallen out. We thus omitted some of the fiche, including the very detailed pages that completed Tom Hassall's article in volume 54. In addition, the fiche from 1980 had somehow become white on black rather than black on white and defied attempts to scan it.

George Lambrick has assembled the following table of fiches issued with the journal.

YearVolumeArticleNumber of ficheStatus
198045Palmer, the Hamel2Could not scan
198348Halpin, Hinksey Hall1Online
198449Durham et al, Thames Crossing1Online
198449Hassall et al, St Ebbes post medieval7Online
198550Lambrick, Dominicans1Online
198752Chambers et al, Queensford Farm1Omitted
198954Hassall et al, St Ebbes medieval6Omitted

With the kind help of Alison Roberts of the Ashmolean, we have now secured a printed copy of the 1980 fiche of sufficient quality to allow a good scan to be made. These two fiches are being added to the website at the moment. Fortunately the problem of quality does not arise with the 1987 and 1989 fiches, and we hope to add them soon.

As with the rest of the online edition, excluding the most recent five volumes, this material is released under a Creative Commons licence.

If you want to work with this material, you will find that the individual files are rather large. We recommend that you download the fiche to your computer rather than trying to browse online.

Oxoniensia volume 78 published2nd January, 2014

Oxoniensia, vol. 78 is now available to subscribers, in hard copy and electronically. OAHS members can read the online version by clicking on the ‘Browse volumes’ tab to the right of this screen and scrolling down to the bottom of the next page (or follow this shortcut). Volumes 73 (2008) moves to open access.

Oxoniensia volume 77 published20th December, 2012

Oxoniensia, vol. 77 is now available to subscribers, in hard copy and electronically. OAHS members can read the online version by clicking on the ‘Browse volumes’ tab to the right of this screen and scrolling down to the bottom of the next page (or follow this shortcut). Volumes 72 (2007) moves to open access.

The volume numbers after 75 are supposed to appear in Arabic numerals but for all our efforts remain determinedly Roman. We will address this soon.

Oxoniensia volume 75 published2nd December, 2010

Oxoniensia, vol. 75 is now available to subscribers, in hard copy and electronically. OAHS members can read the online version by clicking on the ‘Browse volumes’ tab to the right of this screen and scrolling down to the bottom of the next page (or follow this shortcut). Previous volumes up to and including volume 70 (2005) are freely available to the public.

The latest volume of the journal includes three articles on medieval towns (Oxford, Abingdon, and Wallingford), each exploring different aspects of early urban development in the county. These and other articles, including one on early river crossings and another on industrial buildings in Oxford, benefit from a strong emphasis on material evidence. Conversely, a major report on excavations at The Queen's College, Oxford is strengthened by analysis of historical, visual, and architectural sources. The volume also has two new notes providing a round-up of last year's archaeological activity in Oxford and Oxfordshire. The extended reviews section includes two books from the important Thames through Time series and Simon Townley’s new VCH/EPE history of Henley-on-Thames in the far south of the county.

The editor, Dr Stephen Mileson, is always pleased to discuss possible future contributions:

Oxoniensia back numbers12th October, 2010

With the launch of this site O.A.H.S. has decided to reduce its stock of printed back numbers, retaining only a few copies of each year other than the most recent. We have varying numbers of copies from different years — pre-1945 years are very rare, from 1945 to about 1980 coverage is patchy and after that we have abundant supplies of most years. We recognise that some readers will always prefer to have a printed copy rather than an online one, and we may in future use the high-quality scans we commissioned to produce volumes or thematic selections of articles by print on demand.

This is an ideal (and probably final) opportunity for any members building collections to fill gaps in their sets. The journals are currently stored in Bicester, and those willing to make their way there and collect their volumes may have them free of charge. Those wanting sets sent by post will have to negotiate a charge for postage.

Those interested should contact the membership secretary, Peter Marsh, by email . If you know of others interested please let them know. The offer is not restricted to subscribers; we'll be pleased to supply to libraries amd other institutions as well as individuals.

Oxoniensia 75 preview5th September, 2010

Oxoniensia 75 ranges widely over period and subject matter, from Iron-Age settlement in north Oxfordshire to the foundation of the Oxford Architectural Society (a progenitor of the OAHS) and the design and function of industrial buildings in Oxford (which are illustrated in numerous colour plates). This year's articles include three pieces on medieval towns (Oxford, Abingdon, and Wallingford). Each of these explores different aspects of early urban development, including Anglo-Saxon burh foundation, medieval town planning, and the impact of royal castle-building. These and several other articles benefit from a strong emphasis on material evidence, while a report on excavations at the Queen's College, Oxford is strengthened by analysis of historical, visual, and architectural sources. The volume also includes two new notes providing round-ups of last year's archaeological activity in city and county. Finally, there is a lengthy reviews section, covering a range of periods and topics. It is hoped that volume 75 will be sent to members and made available to subscribers here before Christmas.

Stephen Mileson, Editor of Oxoniensia

Oxoniensia online19th May, 2010

The Oxoniensia website was launched at the O. A. H. S. Annual General Meeting on June 8th. The bulk of Oxoniensia content is now freely available online, and the more recent volumes are available to subscribers.

The possibility of digitising Oxoniensia was first mooted by Malcolm Airs as a possible millennium project for the society. At that time the estimated cost of scanning all past volumes was in excess of £100,000, and so the committee deferred consideration for a few years. The early volumes, unobtainable in print, were partially scanned as Word documents, and on a couple of occasions the project was reconsidered but not pursued.

In 2009 the O. A. H. S. committee agreed to proceed with scanning past volumes. Most of the volumes were available for breaking from the society’s stock (scanning of broken volumes costs a tenth as much as scanning whole ones) and the remainder were loaned by Julian Munby and scanned whole.

From the start consideration was given to users with lowish bandwidth. It was decided to divide the volumes into articles (together with their associated plates, which in early years were actually located at the back of the volume) so that articles could easily be downloaded rather than read online. The scanned colour images have been reduced in resolution as far as was consistent with legibility. The society retains the original very high resolution scans, of course, and will improve image quality as wider bandwidth becomes more generally available. A hundred page site report with detailed colour images seems a fearsomely large thing, but in fact compared to a minute of broadcast high definition television it is a mere speck in the world of online data.

At the same time as we scanned the past volumes, the society agreed with Boydell and Brewer, who undertake the publication of the printed volumes, that future volumes would be supplied as PDF files, so that no further scanning would be needed. These recent volumes contain the original text and images as sent to the typesetter, and so are both much smaller and much more accurate than the scanned volumes. We would like to record here our gratitude to Boydell and Brewer for their help with this side of the project. As it will be several years before the volumes they have typeset become publicly available, we have moved a sample article to the public area to demonstrate the improvement of quality involved.

There remain a few tasks to be completed. Better finding aids are needed, and there will be a page where users can help build these by noting keywords that should be associated with articles they read, and also by adding the summaries from articles to a database. Some of the articles are too large and take an age to download even with a very fast connection, and these will be divided into sections. However, as the volumes are now on our website, it seems sensible to make them available now and make changes to the site later as needed.

Reader feedback on the site is welcome, and there is a discussion forum where any problems can be discussed and changes suggested. The button labelled Discuss will take you there. Please respect the distinction between the two forums; the feedback forum is for comments and questions about this site, and will be monitored regularly, while the Q & A one is for research questions, which may or may not be answered depending on who reads them.


© Oxfordshire Architectural and Historical Society, 2010-12; all rights reserved.

ISSN 0308–5562